American Dairy Coalition Inc.
PO Box 10976, Green Bay, WI 54307-0976
Phone:  1.920.965.6070
Email: ​ 

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GUIDE: What to do if ICE comes knocking?

​1. Know Your Private Property Rights. According to Kelly Fortier, a farm immigration attorney with firm Michael Best, you do not have to give private property access to any government official without consent. “Unless they have some kind of subpoena or warrant, they’re not allowed to just walk around without the permission of the business owner,” she says. Additionally, Fortier advises every farm have a plan in place to know what to do if an immigration enforcement agent shows up at your farm. Ensure whoever the agent’s first point of contact knows to call the farm owner, knows who has the ability to give agents consent to be on the property without a warrant, and make sure everyone knows what to do if the agent does have a warrant.  “It seems like common sense, but in the heat of the moment it’s really nice to have some kind of written procedure for what people should do,” she says.

2. Get Your Form I-9s in Order. Fortier says it’s a good idea to ensure all of your I-9s are ready to go and are organized if they aren’t already. “If the government wants to look at employers they’ll usually look at the I-9s and start there,” she says. Fortier says it’s a good idea to audit the I-9s yourself to ensure they are filled out completely and void of any errors. The most common immigration related fines for an employer are related to I-9 forms having some kind of error. “It’s easy to make errors on the I-9 forms so it’s not shocking to be fined for I-9 issues,” she says.

3. Have a Staffing Plan. While most of the workers in question are being picked up at their home, the situation can still cause issues for farmers. Fortier recommends farmers have a staffing plan in place in the event one or more of their employees does not show up for work. “Once an individual is picked up it’s very hard to predict when they might be coming back, if ever,” she says. “If there is an immigration problem, the farm may never see them again.”

4. Give Agents Your Full Cooperation. While you don’t have to allow agents to roam your private property without consent, it’s imperative that you aren’t seen as harboring a criminal. “If the government thinks you’re proactively hiding or sheltering individuals you know are in the country unlawfully, you could be facing criminal liability, even seizing of assets,” she says. Be sure employees know not to hide from agents. Be prepared to find an employee and bring them to an agent who arrives with a warrant for that person.

Read the full article here.


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Losing Immigrant Workers on Dairy Farms Would Nearly Double Retail Milk Prices and Cost the Economy More than $32 Billion, Report Finds

​​​Half of all workers on U.S. dairy farms are immigrants, and the damage from losing those workers would extend far beyond the farms, nearly doubling retail milk prices and costing the total U.S. economy more than $32 billion, according to a report commissioned by the National Milk Producers Federation.

The report, which includes the results of a nationwide survey of farms, found that one-third of all U.S. dairy farms employ foreign-born workers, and that those farms produce nearly 80 percent of the nation’s milk.

Continue reading the article here.
The full report can be found here.

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